Uprooted Magnolia

Yellowstone: Living Landscapes

Posted in Nature, Photography, Travel by leahyetter on June 13, 2016

We stayed in Gardiner Montana, just near the  north entrance of the park. Located about 5 miles from the entrance is the Mammoth Hot Springs, our first stop in Yellowstone.

©Leah Yetter Photographer

Mammoth Hot Springs is a large complex of hot springs on a hill of travertine, a form of limestone deposited by mineral springs.

©Leah Yetter Photographer

“It was created over thousands of years as hot water from the spring cooled and deposited calcium carbonate (over two tons flow into Mammoth each day in a solution). Because of the huge amount of geothermal vents, travertine flourishes. Although these springs lie outside the caldera boundary, their energy has been attributed to the same magmatic system that fuels other Yellowstone geothermal areas”- Thank you, Wikipedia

©Leah Yetter Photographer

It was a cool morning but the steam coming from the springs warmed us right up.

©Leah Yetter Photographer

©Leah Yetter Photographer

Detail shots of mineral build up.

©Leah Yetter Photographer

©Leah Yetter Photographer

©Leah Yetter Photographer

©Leah Yetter Photographer

It’s quite a hike touring these hot springs and fortunately there is a boardwalk to steer us in the right direction.
Just look at those two.

©Leah Yetter Photographer

We sat for a bit to take it all in then took to the road to make our way to Old Faithful, one of the most predictable geographical features on earth. It erupts every 35 to 120 minutes. Our plan was to have lunch at the Old Faithful Lodge and sit out and watch this geyser shoot boiling water up to 185 ft in the air .

©Leah Yetter Photographer

But it’s so hard not to stop at every turnout to admire the great scenery.

©Leah Yetter Photographer

Here, we stopped at Roaring Mountain. Roaring Mountain is full of microscopic organisms wearing away at the mountain amid the sulfur rich gases. It is inhospitable to humans but is the perfect home for heat-loving microbes.

©Leah Yetter Photographer

We loaded back into the van and headed south. We came upon a long line of cars about 10 miles or so from the Old Faithful Historic District. We sat for a while and waited. And waited. You expect long lines and a lot of traffic through the park but we felt something bigger was going on. Plus, at the time of year that we were there, the crowds hadn’t made it to the park yet. Surprisingly so far, the crowds were not that big. So we flagged down a driver coming the other direction and in her thick and kind British accent, she told us that a large herd of Bison had parked themselves in the road and weren’t going anywhere, anytime soon. So, we turned around and made a different plan. We found lunch and happened upon some wildlife along the way and finished out the day admiring the gorgeous landscapes. More on that tomorrow. 🙂


 

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19 Responses

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  1. […] via Yellowstone: Living Landscapes — Uprooted Magnolia […]

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  2. Oleksandra Budna said, on June 13, 2016 at 7:22 pm

    Beautiful shots! Yellowstone is an incredible park, one of the best trips we’ve had so far. We came across quite a few bison jams while we were there, too 🙂

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    • leahyetter said, on June 14, 2016 at 8:51 am

      Isn’t is great! We were overwhelmed by the beauty and vast landscapes. It was an incredible trip. We were wowed by the Tetons too.

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  3. ClareSnow said, on June 13, 2016 at 9:32 pm

    the limestone flow is surreal. where i live we have underground limestone. i thought our cliffs were stunning but they dont compare!

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    • leahyetter said, on June 14, 2016 at 8:49 am

      Isn’t it neat! It’s huge out there and the pictures don’t do it justice. I wish I could have showed objects to project the scale of this spring. I was able to use people in some later shots to show scale at the geysers and some other parts of the park. Stay tuned…

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  4. Michael Williams said, on June 14, 2016 at 12:05 am

    Beautiful shots of Yellowstone. The diversity of this park is almost endless. I lived 7 miles from the east gate for a year in 1976. I worked on a dude ranch and visited the park often. Your beautiful images are a source of potent nostalgia for me.

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    • leahyetter said, on June 14, 2016 at 8:47 am

      Oh cool! How lucky were you! I agree, the diversity is endless and we did our best to see it all. We were there 4 days and were in sensory overload after that. But I know we didn’t see it all. Glad you enjoy these…you should make a trip back out there sometime. I think autumn in the park would be nice. There is a great population of Quaking Aspens and while they were a fluorescent green, I know that in the fall that they are golden and gorgeous!

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  5. Doris said, on June 14, 2016 at 12:47 am

    Mammoth Springs really looks like giant mammoth feet. I love the pictures and would love to go see Yellowstone straight away. It must be breathtaking. We do have gorgeous spots in Germany as well, but they really don’t compare …

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    • leahyetter said, on June 14, 2016 at 8:42 am

      It is really impressive in size. Pictures don’t do it justice. I should have held a pencil in a few spots to get an idea of scale! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  6. solesisterjuliet said, on June 14, 2016 at 4:48 am

    Somehow the words like ‘stunning’ and ‘breathtaking’ seem too small for such beauty. Your photos are priceless – so gorgeous. Isn’t it awesome that the National Park Service is celebrating 100 years this year?!

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    • leahyetter said, on June 14, 2016 at 8:40 am

      You are so correct. Dad and I struggled to find the right words. The words we are using right now is awe-inspiring. Still doesn’t seem like enough though. We often found ourselves saying “Wow. Oh Wow look at that.” Yes, we thought it was awesome to be there on it’s 100th birthday of becoming a National Park! 🙂

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  7. Jane said, on June 14, 2016 at 6:09 am

    What can you say? “Beautiful…Beautiful”. I’ve visited 3 times, but it’s been years. Seeing it through your eyes is so great! Thank you for sharing your journey with us.

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    • leahyetter said, on June 14, 2016 at 8:37 am

      It is so beautiful there. How lucky you are to have visited 3 times! It was sensory overload for us but I do believe another visit should be on the agenda!

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  8. dianegates said, on June 15, 2016 at 4:01 pm

    I’m always so thrilled to see your name pop up on my screen, Leah. Never been in this part of the country…except through your photos. Thanks so much! 🙂

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  9. Deb Jones said, on June 15, 2016 at 8:27 pm

    Really enjoyed your photos of Yellowstone. We didn’t make it over to Mammoth often during our last 10 visits. We used to go every May but opted out this year. Just too many ppl. We are mostly wolf watchers and that has become very popular as well as Grizz and Black Bear watchers…Did you get to see any elk calves? I spent quite a bit of time shooting pics of Pika last year…always a good way to pass the time. Yellowstone is a beautiful place. Again, thanks for sharing, and tho I don’t comment much I do look at and enjoy your photos.

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    • leahyetter said, on June 21, 2016 at 12:01 pm

      Hey Deb! Thanks for commenting! We fortunately weren’t there for the largest crowds. It wasn’t too bad but as we were leaving, we could tell that the numbers were getting larger! We saw a wolf den but never saw wolves. We didn’t have a spotting scope but at least I saw about where the den was! We saw a couple of black bears but no grizzlies. We saw an elk calf in the Mammoth Springs area but not out in the wild. We saw more bull elk than cow anyway. It was pretty warm so obviously they weren’t out in the middle of the day when we were out and about.
      Nice to hear from you! I did think about you guys before we took off on this adventure. I knew you guys went a lot!

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  10. Dr. Sandra Townsend Burroughs said, on June 19, 2016 at 10:22 pm

    Your pictures create a longing to visit and soak in all the beauty firsthand. Nice work.

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